Pierre Dominique GARNIER

Family tree of Pierre Dominique GARNIER

French Revolution & Empire, 19th Century

FrenchBorn Pierre Dominique GARNIER

French general during the French Revolutionary Wars and Napoleonic Wars

Born on December 19, 1756 in Marseille, France , France

Died on May 11, 1827 in Nantes, France

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The son of an architect, he enlisted as a foot soldier in the French royal army in 1773 and later served in the French West Indies for eight years. In 1784 he transferred to the Ile-de-France Dragoons and remained until 1788. After briefly pursuing a career as an architect, he joined the Marseilles National Guards in 1789. He was involved in the Assault on the Tuileries Palace on 10 August 1792. In this incident, the National Guards attacked the Swiss Guards and, after a sharp battle, massacred most of the survivors. Garnier fought in the Alps, on the Rhine, and in Italy. He earned promotion to general of brigade on 12 September 1793. He was responsible for suppressing the counter-revolution in the County of Nice. He participated in the attack on Mont Faron during the Siege of Toulon in late 1793.



Garnier received promotion to general of division on 20 December 1793 and returned to the Army of Italy in April 1794 where he may have fought at the Battle of Saorgio. He transferred to the Army of the Alps, where he served during most of 1795. However, he was back in the Army of Italy in November 1795 when he fought at the Battle of Loano. After a brief stint in the Army of the Alps, he was back in the Army of Italy in the spring of 1796 when Napoleon Bonaparte arrived to assume command. The small divisions of Garnier and Francois Macquard defended the Col de Tende and were not in action during the Montenotte Campaign. After the French success, a messenger arrived from the north ordering Garnier and Macquard to join the rest of the army in Piedmont.

...   The son of an architect, he enlisted as a foot soldier in the French royal army in 1773 and later served in the French West Indies for eight years. In 1784 he transferred to the Ile-de-France Dragoons and remained until 1788. After briefly pursuing a career as an architect, he joined the Marseilles National Guards in 1789. He was involved in the Assault on the Tuileries Palace on 10 August 1792. In this incident, the National Guards attacked the Swiss Guards and, after a sharp battle, massacred most of the survivors. Garnier fought in the Alps, on the Rhine, and in Italy. He earned promotion to general of brigade on 12 September 1793. He was responsible for suppressing the counter-revolution in the County of Nice. He participated in the attack on Mont Faron during the Siege of Toulon in late 1793.



Garnier received promotion to general of division on 20 December 1793 and returned to the Army of Italy in April 1794 where he may have fought at the Battle of Saorgio. He transferred to the Army of the Alps, where he served during most of 1795. However, he was back in the Army of Italy in November 1795 when he fought at the Battle of Loano. After a brief stint in the Army of the Alps, he was back in the Army of Italy in the spring of 1796 when Napoleon Bonaparte arrived to assume command. The small divisions of Garnier and Francois Macquard defended the Col de Tende and were not in action during the Montenotte Campaign. After the French success, a messenger arrived from the north ordering Garnier and Macquard to join the rest of the army in Piedmont.



At the time, Garnier's 3,426-man 6th Division (4th Division of the Corps de Bataille) included three battalions of the 20th Line Infantry Demi-Brigade and one battalion of the 7th Provisional Line Infantry Demi-Brigade. His three brigadiers were Jean Davin, Guilin Bizanet, and Joseph Colomb. On 12 August 1796, Bonaparte wrote a letter to the French Directory, giving an assessment of his generals. His harsh opinion of Garnier, Jean-Baptiste Meynier, and Raphael Casabianca stated, "incapable; not fit to command a battalion in a war as active and serious as this one".



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