Frederick BILLINGS

Family tree of Frederick BILLINGS

Industrialist, Businessman

AmericanBorn Frederick BILLINGS

American lawyer and financier, president of the Northern Pacific Railway

Born on September 27, 1823 in Royalton, Vermont, USA , United States

Died on September 30, 1890 in Woodstock, Vermont, USA

Family tree

Report an error

This form allows you to report an error or to submit additional information about this family tree: Frederick BILLINGS (1823)

More information

Billings was born in Royalton, Windsor County, Vermont, graduated from the University of Vermont in 1844 and went on to pursue a career in law. In 1848, during the California Gold Rush, he moved to San Francisco, becoming the city's first land claims lawyer. Later he would partner with Henry Halleck, in the law firm of Halleck, Peachy & Billings, which became a leading law firm in San Francisco. While in California, he was a trustee of the College of California (later, the University of California at Berkeley) and suggested that the college be named for George Berkeley.



In 1864, he returned to Woodstock, Vermont, and in 1869 purchased George Perkins Marsh's former estate. Billings had read Marsh's pioneering volume on ecology called Man and Nature, and set about to put into practice his theories on conservation. Billings and his heirs set about purchasing many failing farms and reforesting much of the surrounding hillsides with Norway Spruce, Scots Pine, European Larch, and many native species. Today, the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Woodstock manages and interprets what is probably the oldest managed forest in the United States. The Billings Farm & Museum is a working dairy farm and museum, just across the street is the gateway to learning about Vermont's agricultural history.

...   Billings was born in Royalton, Windsor County, Vermont, graduated from the University of Vermont in 1844 and went on to pursue a career in law. In 1848, during the California Gold Rush, he moved to San Francisco, becoming the city's first land claims lawyer. Later he would partner with Henry Halleck, in the law firm of Halleck, Peachy & Billings, which became a leading law firm in San Francisco. While in California, he was a trustee of the College of California (later, the University of California at Berkeley) and suggested that the college be named for George Berkeley.



In 1864, he returned to Woodstock, Vermont, and in 1869 purchased George Perkins Marsh's former estate. Billings had read Marsh's pioneering volume on ecology called Man and Nature, and set about to put into practice his theories on conservation. Billings and his heirs set about purchasing many failing farms and reforesting much of the surrounding hillsides with Norway Spruce, Scots Pine, European Larch, and many native species. Today, the Marsh-Billings-Rockefeller National Historical Park in Woodstock manages and interprets what is probably the oldest managed forest in the United States. The Billings Farm & Museum is a working dairy farm and museum, just across the street is the gateway to learning about Vermont's agricultural history.



Billings later purchased one of the original twelfth interests in the Northern Pacific Railway and, from 1879 to 1881, served as its president. He constructed a chapel for the Congregational Church of Woodstock. Although he never owned a home in Billings, Montana, a railroad town established in 1882 and named after him, he provided the money to build the First Congregational Church and the first school in that town. He also built and endowed Billings Library, completed in 1885 for The University of Vermont, and purchased the George Perkins Marsh collection of 12,000 volumes for it.



At the time of his death, legend states that Billings had hidden a chest full of millions of dollars of gold in the Beartooth Mountains.



© Copyright Wikipédia authors - This article is under licence CC BY-SA 3.0


 

Geographical origins

The map below shows the places where the ancestors of the famous person lived.

Loading... An error has occured while loading the map.