Jean Pierre FALRET

Family tree of Jean Pierre FALRET

Physician

FrenchBorn Jean Pierre FALRET

Insane physician, psychiatrist

Born on April 26, 1794 in Marcilhac-sur-Célé, Lot , France

Died on October 28, 1870 in Marcilhac-sur-Célé, Lot , France

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Jean-Pierre Falret (French: [ʒɑ̃ pjɛʁ falʁɛ]; 26 April 1794 – 28 October 1870) was a French psychiatrist. He was born and died in Marcilhac-sur-Célé.
In 1811 he began his medical studies in Paris, where he was inspired by the work of Philippe Pinel (1745–1826) and Jean Étienne Dominique Esquirol (1772–1840). In 1819 he obtained his medical doctorate, afterwards establishing a mental institution with Félix Voisin (1794–1872) at Vanves (1822). In 1831 he was appointed chef de l’hospice at the Salpêtrière, a position he maintained until his retirement in 1867.
In 1851 he published an article describing a condition he called la folie circulaire (French pronunciation: [la fɔli siʁkylɛʁ] – circular insanity), of which a patient would experience cycles of manic excitement and cycles of depression. Falret's description is considered to be the earliest documented diagnosis of what today is known as a bipolar affective disorder.
...   Jean-Pierre Falret (French: [ʒɑ̃ pjɛʁ falʁɛ]; 26 April 1794 – 28 October 1870) was a French psychiatrist. He was born and died in Marcilhac-sur-Célé.
In 1811 he began his medical studies in Paris, where he was inspired by the work of Philippe Pinel (1745–1826) and Jean Étienne Dominique Esquirol (1772–1840). In 1819 he obtained his medical doctorate, afterwards establishing a mental institution with Félix Voisin (1794–1872) at Vanves (1822). In 1831 he was appointed chef de l’hospice at the Salpêtrière, a position he maintained until his retirement in 1867.
In 1851 he published an article describing a condition he called la folie circulaire (French pronunciation: [la fɔli siʁkylɛʁ] – circular insanity), of which a patient would experience cycles of manic excitement and cycles of depression. Falret's description is considered to be the earliest documented diagnosis of what today is known as a bipolar affective disorder.
Falret believed in the dualistic nature of the individual, and a separation of body and soul. He proposed that when the soul and a diseased condition interact, a phenomenon he called novum organon appeared. Accordingly, this manifestation of the novum organon created disturbances of the soul and caused mental illness. He believed that this mental condition could not be remedied by somatic treatment alone, but mainly through "psychic" moral methods.
His son Jules Falret (1824-1902), with psychiatrist Ernest-Charles Lasègue (1816–1883), identified a shared psychotic disorder sometimes referred to as "Lasègue-Falret syndrome" (folie à deux). The syndrome is characterized by the coincidental appearance of psychotic symptoms in family members while living together, as well as retention of the symptoms when the individuals are separated. This syndrome can also involve a situation where a diseased family member transmits psychotic symptoms to healthy members of the family. The two doctors published their findings in a treatise called La folie à deux ou folie communiquée.
Today the Le Centre Hospitalier Jean-Pierre Falret is a psychiatric hospital system serving the department of Lot.



Biography from Wikipedia (see original) under licence CC BY-SA 3.0

 

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